2017 TOUR Championship Odds: Spieth Betting Favorite Against Johnson Again

Another top-10 finish has put Jordan Spieth on the brink of winning the FedEx Cup heading into the final event of the playoffs, this week’s TOUR Championship at East Lake Golf Club in Atlanta, Georgia.

Spieth is coming off a seventh-place finish at the BMW Championship, and he is listed as the +500 favorite (bet $100 to win $500) to take home the TOUR Championship title at sportsbooks monitored by OddsShark over +750 second choice Dustin Johnson, who ended up a disappointing 33rd last week.

Johnson started off strong in the FedEx Cup playoffs, winning the Northern Trust Open in a playoff over Spieth. But he followed that with an 18th-place finish in the Dell Technologies Championship while Spieth was second there as well.

Spieth now leads the FedEx Cup standings with 5,421 points, with Johnson sitting in third place on 4,730 and Justin Thomas in between them in second with 5,081.

Thomas is the +1100 fourth choice to win the TOUR Championship, right behind Rickie Fowler (+1000) and just ahead of Jon Rahm, Jason Day and Justin Rose, who are all +1200 on the betting board.

After winning the Dell Technologies Championship and finishing sixth in the Northern Trust Open, it looked like Thomas was in position to overtake both Spieth and Johnson in the FedEx Cup standings. But he struggled to a 47th-place finish at the BMW Championship and will need to bounce back here.

Marc Leishman earned 2,000 FedEx Cup points for winning the BMW Championship, although Fowler, Rahm, Day and Rose all played exceptionally well to get the attention of oddsmakers going into the TOUR Championship.

Rose and Fowler tied for second in the BMW Championship, Day was fourth and Rahm tied for fifth with Matt Kuchar, who is +2800 on the golf betting lines to win the TOUR Championship. Leishman is listed at +1800, and he is ranked fourth in the FedEx Cup standings with 4,084 points following his victory.

It is worth noting that there are only 30 golfers in the TOUR Championship field, with defending FedEx Cup champion Rory McIlroy unable to repeat his title run at East Lake as he has already been eliminated. Last year, McIlroy beat out Ryan Moore and Kevin Chappell in a playoff, and the latter is still alive this year at +3300 to win it.

Read more Golf news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2734142-2017-tour-championship-odds-spieth-betting-favorite-against-johnson-again

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Is Kyrie Really ‘Being Woke’? Understanding Irving’s Public Moment of Zen

The modern professional athlete serves many purposes in our society. For one, they are excellent spokespeople for products ranging from homeowners insurance all the way down to your favorite local fast food chain. For years, the defining aspect of Isaiah Thomas‘ career for me was him stating clearly for the record that he was, in fact, a “pizza guy.”

Athletes can also be engines for social change, like Colin Kaepernick‘s anthem protest or LeBron James speaking out about Ferguson. Athletes are icons, role models, and, in the rarefied air of true superstars, they’re economic powerhouses that rival small island nations. And they’re also people. I know, hard to believe.

In an appearance on ESPN’s First Take on Monday, new Celtic Kyrie Irving made it clear his trade demand was for himself and himself alone. When pressed on whether LeBron James was consulted about his decision to ask to be dealt out of Cleveland, he said:

“I don’t think you owe anything to another person in terms of figuring out what you want to do with your life. It’s not anything personal. I’m not here to tirade anybody or to go at any particular person or the organization, because I have nothing but love for Cleveland. I have nothing but love for the times that I spent there. It’s nothing about that. There comes a time where you mature as an individual, it’s time to make that decision. And there is no looking back from that standpoint. There is no time to figure out how to save someone’s feelings when ultimately you have to be selfish in figuring out what you want to do.”

The short version is, he’s a grown man and he made a decision based on what was best for him. The quirk here is that what’s best for him seems borderline ridiculous to you and me, the average cranky sports fans. How could he not want to play with the best basketball player of his generation? How could he leave a team that’s been to the NBA Finals three years in a row to start from scratch with a Celtics franchise that hasn’t been to the Finals in the last seven seasons? Kyrie, are you out of your mind?

Saying you don’t want to play with LeBron James is akin to saying your favorite flavor of LaCroix is coconut. Not even talking to him before the decision made it even more perplexing. After all they’ve been through, one might think they were best friends, when in reality, like most of the people you interact with at work, they’re simply colleagues. There aren’t many professions left where it’s expected that you consult your colleagues on business decisions, but the highest strata of pro sports is one of them. 

It doesn’t help when someone like Irving, at the top of his chosen career field, says things on ESPN (h/t Washington Post) like “I don’t really have an ego. I have a presence and aura about me that’s very reality-based,” or “Oh, if you’re very much woke, there’s no such thing as distractions, especially all this.”

I don’t think much about my own aura, nor do I imagine many people do. I’m more concerned with how my breath smells or whether or not you noticed that my socks don’t match because I was in too much of a hurry to find the right pair.

Initially, you read Kyrie’s quotes about “being woke,” “not having an ego,” and “remaining reality-based” and wonder how a multi-millionaire celebrity basketball player can live in anything resembling “reality.” But that success allows people like Kyrie Irving to spend most of their time focusing on themselves and what’s around them. Consider all the lonely days in the gym getting shots up, the hours of cardio and the interminable travel that comes with being an NBA player. That’s a lot of time to ponder, and it’s time you and I just don’t have.

In 2017, I don’t think we know what we want from superstar athletes, besides an unfettered ability to criticize them for whatever transgressions (perceived or otherwise) they have perpetrated on us or our favorite team. Entire television networks exist for the purposes of second (and third) guessing every move people like Kyrie, LeBron, Kevin Durant and others make.

Athletes are also unique in the celebrity world in that they ostensibly represent our personal interests when they do their jobs. They’re not just employees; they’re avatars of our happiness or sadness. They work for our city, after all. So when Kyrie leaves the Cavs, he’s not just abandoning his teammates or owner Dan Gilbert. He’s ditching an entire metropolitan area.

Same with KD, who walked out of Oklahoma City to go play for the Warriors. To a certain type of fan, it was a slight against the citizens of an American state, not a business decision. The fact that Durant is still defending himself to random strangers on Twitter proves how deeply hurt a lot of NBA heads were when he went to Oakland to create the T-1000 of basketball squads.

Dirk Nowitzki, in the latter stages of a surefire Hall of Fame career, recently came out and said that there’s a lack of loyalty in the NBA today. Last week, he told SiriusXM NBA Radio that in today’s game “it’s about making money and winning and not as much about being loyal anymore.” This is a curious statement, because it places the power in the organization that reaps the benefits of a player’s talent, rather than in the blessed hands of the man or woman performing the miraculous athletic feats that bring people to the arena.

Questions of loyalty rarely come up with receptionists, dentists or school bus drivers. The media doesn’t spend hour after breathless hour debating whether a driving school instructor respects the organization that pays his or her bills. Then again, none of the people who do those jobs are responsible for the self-esteem of their entire zip code.

Kyrie Irving will always be the guy who hit the dagger to clinch Game 7 of the 2016 Finals. At the same time, he’s not the guy who blocked Andre Iguodala‘s layup. There’s being great, and then there’s being the greatest.

The idea of being The Guy on an NBA team is what initially bugged so many people about Durant’s exit to the Bay Area. NBA watchers couldn’t understand why Durant was shirking his perceived responsibility as a leader to join a team that already had more than one top dog. Now, Kyrie is taking flak for actively looking for a situation where he could be The Guy. Kyrie and KD are different people with different priorities, though there’s some generic overlap like winning and making money—the very things Nowitzki feels are warping the values of the game.

I don’t see the idea of players dictating their futures as controversial. It’s light years away from the borderline indentured servitude athletes toiled under in the middle of the last century, when player movement was heavily restricted and free agency simply didn’t exist. Men and women with the innate drive to be the best tend to want to decide their own fates just as much as a cheese-eating schlub like myself.

They make more money than us. They drive nicer cars than us. Whether they stand for the national anthem is front page news. Still, they put their pants on one leg at a time and various other folksy cliches. Doesn’t it make the sport more fun to let these guys be themselves as much as possible? Shouldn’t we encourage that?

Athletes are paid pitchpeople and avatars for civic pride, but they’re also avatars for our personal hopes, dreams and aspirations. They get to risk everything and succeed or fail on their own with relative financial security, a luxury few of us are afforded in our lifetime. He can say the earth is flat on national television, which is the ultimate expression of “shoot your shot” we have right now. Cheer or boo Kyrie Irving. Understand him or not. At least he’s being real.


Dave Schilling is a writer-at-large for Bleacher Report and B/R Mag. Follow him on Twitter: @dave_schilling.

Read more NBA news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2734015-is-kyrie-really-being-woke-understanding-irvings-public-moment-of-zen

Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial

Alex Morgan Nets 2 Goals as USA Crushes New Zealand 5-0 in Friendly

Two goals from Alex Morgan fueled a second easy win for the United States women’s national team over New Zealand in a span of five days.

After the Americans earned a 3-1 win in Colorado Friday, they followed it up with a 5-0 victory Tuesday over the same squad in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Lindsey Horan, Mallory Pugh and Lynn Williams also scored, but Morgan had the biggest night despite playing only the second half.

Mia Hamm liked what she saw from the performance:

New Zealand scored a goal in the last match and was mostly competitive, but the team had limited opportunities in this one. 

The Football Ferns controlled just 30 percent of possession and got zero shots on net, per ESPN FC.

It was the home team that controlled the action from the start, with the ball sitting deep in New Zealand’s zone for most of the first 30 minutes of the match. Although the match remained scoreless, it seemed to only be a matter of time until someone broke through.

The opening goal finally came in the 36th minute when Samantha Mewis hit a long cross into the box for Horan, who headed it just over the opposing keeper for the goal. Fox Soccer captured the first score:

Horan had only entered the match three minutes earlier for Rose Lavelle, who is still less than 100 percent in her return from a hamstring injury.

Before the end of the first half, Horan made her presence felt one more time on a perfect weighted ball to Mallory Pugh. The 19-year-old slotted it home to give USA a 2-0 lead.

Thomas Floyd of Goal.com summed up the early play from Horan:

The theme of subs making a quick impact continued in the second half, with Morgan scoring two goals after coming on at halftime, including one less than 30 seconds into play.

After sneaking the ball past Erin Nayler for her first score, Morgan had a much more forceful look in the 77th minute:

Williams also joined the fun, taking a cross from Kelley O’Hara and driving it home for a score:

Although it was difficult to judge Alyssa Naeher in net with few challenges throughout the night, the rest of the USWNT lived up to expectations with solid play from every level to create a one-sided finish.

Even without a major tournament coming up, the team is clearly headed in the right direction.

The United States will have a similar set of international friendlies against South Korea on Oct. 19 and 22. The first of the two battles will be at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, which could lead to quite a crowd as the team prepares for bigger events in 2018.

Read more World Football news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2734138-alex-morgan-nets-2-goals-as-usa-crushes-new-zealand-5-0-in-friendly

Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew

Chelsea Transfer News: Eden Hazard Talks Ligue 1 Return Amid PSG Rumours

Chelsea forward Eden Hazard has ruled out moving to Paris Saint-Germain and said the only team he would ever join in Ligue 1 is former club Lille OSC.

Per The Sun‘s Steve Goodman, the Belgian star is a long-time target for PSG. However, while he has not ruled out departing Chelsea some time in the future, the Paris giants are not on his list of potential destinations, per SFR Sport (via Goodman):

There are some big clubs [in Ligue 1], and it was an attractive league even when I played in it six years ago.

“Big stars want to play in Ligue 1, and that is a good thing. But if I am to return it will be to play for Lille—they are my club.

“I still have a career to carve out, with a number of seasons ahead of me. I am at Chelsea for the time being, and I don’t know where my career will take me in the future. But if I do go back to France it will be to play for Lille.

Hazard has also been heavily linked with Real Madrid in the past, and the 26-year-old recently refused to rule out a move to the Santiago Bernabeu in the future, per Marca (via Simon Johnson in the Evening Standard).

While PSG may have been linked with Hazard, they added Neymar and Kylian Mbappe to their squad in the summer and arguably no longer need the Belgium international.

Real, on the other hand, could find a space in their first team for Hazard. Cristiano Ronaldo is now 32 and tends to play more centrally than out wide.

Meanwhile, Gareth Bale continues to be linked with a move back to England, most likely to Manchester United, per The Sun‘s Daniel Cutts.

There is certainly a possibility Real could pursue Hazard to fill the role on the left flank and be part of an attacking unit alongside Marco Asensio and Isco.

However, Hazard could well remain at Chelsea for the foreseeable future. He has been crucial in both of the Blues’ two Premier League title wins in the last three seasons and has no immediate need to depart a club where he has huge prospects and is well-loved.

Read more Soccer news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2733864-chelsea-transfer-news-eden-hazard-talks-ligue-1-return-amid-psg-rumours

Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds

Devils Forward Brian Boyle Diagnosed with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

The New Jersey Devils announced Tuesday that center Brian Boyle was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia.

The 32-year-old said he’s focused on the first game of the season.

“My mindset is on Oct. 7. I don’t like missing games. I feel as close to normal as you can feel,” Boyle said, per the team’s Twitter account. “We have a good plan of attack, and I look forward to getting on the ice and playing.”

Boyle had missed practice for what was described as a “personal issue,” per Andrew Gross of the Record.

Amanda Stein of the team’s official site provided more details:

The 10-year veteran signed a two-year deal with the Devils in July after splitting time with the Tampa Bay Lightning and Toronto Maple Leafs last season. He finished the year with 13 goals and 12 assists in 75 games, adding two assists in six playoff games.

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2734108-devils-forward-brian-boyle-diagnosed-with-chronic-myeloid-leukemia

Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin

Canelo Alvarez vs. Gennady Golovkin Rematch Discussions Reportedly Underway

Representatives for Saul “Canelo” Alvarez and Gennady Golovkin are reportedly set to begin discussions this week about a potential rematch for the unified middleweight world boxing championship after they fought to a split draw at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas on Saturday night.

On Tuesday, Dan Rafael of ESPN.com reported Alvarez owns a rematch clause that must be exercised within three weeks, but Golden Boy Promotions president Eric Gomez confirmed further talks with the Golovkin camp before invoking that right.

Golden Boy Promotions president Eric Gomez told Rafael everybody involved was interested in the rematch in the immediate aftermath of Saturday’s draw, but more substantial talks with GGG promoter Tom Loeffler are still to come.

“I spoke to Tom a few times, and he’s certainly open to it after taking to his side, so we agreed to sit down later this week and start discussing it,” Gomez said. “Obviously, we’re going to give Canelo some time off and we’ll start talking to him as well. Immediately after the fight everybody was open to a rematch. I feel it was such a great fight it deserves a rematch, even besides it being such a close fight.”

Loeffler added: “Fans are demanding the rematch. They want a clear winner, which we thought was GGG. But I think Gennady and Canelo owe the fans the rematch and, frankly, for the sport of boxing to right to the bad decision we saw last Saturday. So I’ll sit down with Eric. We had a preliminary conversation to touch base, and HBO definitely thinks we need to do an immediate rematch. They feel the event is red hot and everybody is talking about it.”

The first meeting between the high-profile duo lived up to the hype. Two judges scored it extremely close—Dave Moretti went 115–113 for Golovkin, while Don Trella had a 114-144 draw—but Adalaide Byrd drew criticism for her 118-110 score in favor of Alvarez.

Nevada Athletic State Commission executive director Bob Bennett confirmed to Jack de Menezes of the Independent that Byrd would be taking a break following the performance.

“I’m not going to put her right back in. She’ll still be in the business, but she needs to catch her breath,” he said. “Like in any profession, you have a bad night. Unfortunately, she didn’t do well. I can tell you she conducts training for us, takes judges under her wing, but her score was too wide.”

The controversy overshadowed an otherwise entertaining battle between Alvarez and Golovkin. Now it appears boxing fans will be treated to an immediate rematch between the middleweight superstars, barring any setbacks during the contract talks starting this week.

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2734121-canelo-alvarez-vs-gennady-golovkin-rematch-discussions-reportedly-underway

Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark

Ed Oliver Is the Best Player in CFB, and He’s Not the Only One Who Thinks So

HOUSTON — Ed Oliver, the most disruptive defensive player in college football, a young man who is deeply aware of how gifted he is, fidgets in a chair that can barely hold his 290-pound frame. It is June 29, 57 days before Hurricane Harvey will make landfall along the Texas coast, blanket Houston with nearly four feet of rain and leave much of the state in turmoil.

Here, inside the University of Houston Athletics/Alumni Center, Oliver’s right foot taps the floor repeatedly, pushing his white Nikes up and down in a jackhammer cadence. His iPad, resting on his midsection that has no visible excess mass, bounces up and down. His gray iPhone twirls in his hand like a poker chip. The season cannot get here soon enough.

It is so easy to forget that Oliver, Houston’s star nose tackle, won’t turn 20 until December. As a freshman last season, he was named an All-American by just about every meaningful outlet. His 22.5 tackles for loss were tied for third in the nation. The next closest freshman finished with 12.5.

He speaks with purpose. He bobs up and down with that enormous smile, looking completely at ease as he matches his overwhelming confidence with the appropriate charm.

Like when he talks about his transition to the college game, which is supposed to be a thing. “It was nothing,” Oliver says. “I was ready for college my junior year in high school.”

Or his performance against eventual Heisman winner Lamar Jackson late last season. Although he left the game early with a knee injury, Oliver tormented the nation’s most explosive offensive player and finished with two sacks, three tackles for loss, three batted balls and a forced fumble.

“I do what I always did,” Oliver says.

On where he might have been drafted if he were allowed to leave after his freshman season, he says: “Anywhere in the first round, probably. We’re going off stats? First round. If you’re judging off football ability, first round.”

All the while, his foot never stops bouncing.

        

OLIVER, A SON of Houston, a young man who is hurting because his city is hurting, is much quieter and reserved than normal. It is Sept. 13, 21 days since Hurricane Harvey thrashed the Texas coast, circling the southwest portion of the state long enough to cause massive flooding and devastation to the area.

His body aches more than usual after Houston’s first game of the season in Week 2—a 19-16 victory at Arizona that Oliver says he was anxious for, in part because Houston had to cancel its first game of the year because of the storm. Oliver finished with a very Oliver-like 11 tackles, 1.5 tackles for loss, a forced fumble and a blocked field goal. In the second game, he added another tackle for loss and forced another fumble in a 38-3 win over Rice.

Pro Football Focus graded him as the No. 4 overall defensive linemen in the country and No. 1 against run last season. One Big 12 head coach declared Oliver the best player in the country. Not just the best defensive lineman or defender—the best anywhere.

One AFC scout does little to refute this claim. “He was the best player on the field every time Houston played,” the scout says. “He was the guy from a prospect standpoint that you couldn’t take your eyes off. He can do it all.”

But rather than boast about his strong start and pick up where he left off, Oliver, who grew up just a short drive from the Houston campus, reflects on the last month.

Like the week his team spent in Austin, far away from the storm, following the devastation through social media and photos his mother sent each day from her Houston home, which managed to stay dry.

Or the feeling of driving back to Houston a week later in the darkness of night, peering out his bus window in hopes he could judge the destruction for himself.

“I think [the team drove back at night] on purpose,” Oliver says. “You couldn’t see much. It really doesn’t hit you until you see it with your own eyes.”

Or the Saturday he spent unloading a truckload of supplies when they arrived back home. And the next day he spent inside his uncle’s old home, helping him gut the unsalvageable. Unlike so many, Oliver says his family is doing fine.

Although nothing since late June has gone as he expected, one thing that hasn’t changed is his enviable skill set and desire to convince the rest of the world that he is the best football player on the planet.

“I’ve got better since last year,” he says, his voice finally perking up. “Everything is right where it is supposed to be.”

        

BUT FIRST, THE horses. Their names are Caledonia, Oreo, Coffee and Sugar, and they are largely responsible for the person and player Oliver is today.

Before he could relate to people or football, he could relate to horses. At the age of nine, he shared his passion with his father, Ed Oliver Sr. A month later, Oliver Sr. came home with Caledonia, a beautiful red mare. His son quit football for a while when Caledonia arrived. He wanted to be with his new pet instead.

At the time, school didn’t come easily. In the classroom, he had a hard time sitting still, especially behind the confines of a desk.

“I was a bad kid,” Oliver says. “Always in trouble. The horses were my escape. With them, it was just different.”

So he rode and rode. Eventually, he ditched the saddle entirely. Over the years, he and his father purchased more. Oreo, according to Oliver, is a lot like him. “I feel like we fight like siblings,” he says.

When he misbehaved, his father would limit his time with the animals. As he grew older, the passion for the animals didn’t wane. His father now lives in Louisiana with the horses, and Oliver rides them each time he visits.

“Ed was kind of different,” Marcus Oliver, Ed’s older brother says. “He liked horses more than he liked football. Now I think he treats them the same. He loves both.”

Marcus is a senior offensive lineman at Houston and a legitimate NFL prospect in his own right. His stardom did not come as easily as it has for his younger brother.

They also fought like brothers growing up, bonding with age. Together, they built a barn with their father. Although they are years apart, Marcus views Ed as his twin.

When it came to football, Marcus never forced the game on his younger sibling. When the interest finally took, he was happy to serve as a guide. It was here perhaps that the flashes of potential began. As a seventh-grader at Edwin M. Wells Middle School in Houston, the younger Oliver attended a camp hosted by the local high school coaches.

“It was, ‘Holy s–t’ on every rep,” says A.J. Blum, who coached Oliver at Westfield High School before taking a job as Houston’s defensive line coach. “I knew then he would be the next one.”

Having coached more than 30 defensive linemen who eventually played in college, special talents were not unique for Blum. But this one was different in every way, from his music—a mix of rap and country, these days a combination of Boosie Badazz and Zac Brown Band—to his physical makeup.

Unlike many interior defensive linemen, Oliver has never carried an extra pound if he didn’t have to. He was bigger than most growing up, although he’s always worn those pounds differently.

“I never wanted to be a fat D-lineman,” he says pointing to his nonexistent gut. “I don’t think I need to be. If you’re stronger and faster than them, you should be better than them.”

        

THEY STILL TALK about the night—Oct. 24, 2014. That’s when a 275-pound teenager casually picked up a fumble in his own end zone at Dekaney High School and ran 101 yards in the other direction like no 275-pound teenager should.

Prior to this moment, Oliver wasn’t exactly a secret. After his freshman season at Westfield, he received his first scholarship offer from Oklahoma. But in a matter of 30 seconds, the defensive lineman who moonlighted at running back on occasion showcased an impossible repertoire.

As the touchdowns, sacks and relentless pursuits of quarterbacks accumulated, so did the recognition. By his senior season, Oliver was labeled as a bona fide 5-star talent by every recruiting outlet.

The mail came as expected. Lots of it. But rather than save the artifacts universities sent as keepsakes for later in life like many prized recruits do, Oliver would drop these items off on his coach’s desk for him to discard.

“He didn’t want that stuff,” Blum says. “He didn’t even have a cell phone. He never was impressed with the glitz and glamor—the shiny helmets and the massive stadiums and cool lockers. He was like no other defensive lineman I ever coached.”

At the same time, Oliver was mindful of his recruiting standing. To this day, he is fueled by the fact that he was not Scout.com’s No. 1 player in the nation.

That constant edge has been his driving light, even if it borders on obsession. During the end of his senior year, Oliver watched his soon-to-be former teammates go through the ritual of completing one-rep maximum lifts during spring football.

Oliver asked the staff keep the heaviest weight from each station on the rack. When each player had posted his max on the squat, power clean, bench press and incline-bench press, Oliver walked up to the bar and unceremoniously completed one stress-free rep before walking out of the gym.

        

FROM A LOUNGE chair in his Houston office, a chair that belonged to his former boss less than one year ago, coach Major Applewhite is taking a trip back in time to the Westfield weight room that Oliver turned into his own personal showcase.

It was there that Applewhite, freshly hired by first-year head coach Tom Herman to be Houston’s offensive coordinator, first laid eyes on Oliver, who he mistook for someone too lean to be a defensive end.

“He looked like he was 245 pounds,” Applewhite recalls.

While he originally made the trip to Westfield to recruit dual-threat quarterback Dillon Sterling-Cole, Applewhite returned to his office and threw on the tape of the defensive lineman.

“This guy was Malcolm Brown,” Applewhite says, citing the gifted defensive tackle he played with at Texas. “This was a 290-pound kid who moves like an inside linebacker.”

Houston was hopeful Oliver’s desire to play with his brother and in his hometown would lead him to the Cougars, and, indeed, he committed to the school in the spring of 2015. 

As thrilled as the program was to get him, there was an undeniable reality that lingered in the air: Players like these don’t come to Houston. They join the SEC and chase championships. They leap into NFL pipelines. They go to places with other five-star players.

Texas wanted him. So did Oklahoma. LSU, a team Oliver is not shy in saying he thought long and hard about, nearly landed his commitment.

“He’s a lot like some of the Tigers that I coached,” former LSU head coach Les Miles says of Oliver. “He would have fit in at LSU so well.”

Ultimately, Oliver stuck with his commitment. He loved the idea of playing for his home city, he loved Tom Herman and he loved his brother.

“I was going to do what I wanted to do,” Oliver says. “Regardless of how it happened, I was going to play college football with my brother whether it was at Houston or LSU or somewhere else. Wherever we were going to go, we were going to go together.”

        

IT CANNOT BE stressed enough how miserable this man is to block. He is lean but still powerful. He is powerful but still quick. He is quick but still ferocious and angry enough to do something that goes beyond his physical advantages, of which he has most.

Without his pads on, it becomes clear that he presents a unique matchup problem. Not just with a single team or type of offense, but among offensive lineman so accustomed to going up against what are normally clones of themselves.

So just imagine what it was like to be a Houston lineman seeing something like Oliver for the first time up close. Last fall, the coaching staff put Oliver on the second string defense for the first few days of practice. To Oliver, and to those dealing with him for the first time, these were perhaps the longest 72 hours of their lives.

“I’ve never been so angry,” he adds. “I tried to maul everyone.”

Within days, Oliver was with the starters and became the centerpiece of the defense. The decision came in part because Oliver single-handedly made life miserable on the first-team offense.

Applewhite wanted to see the first group have success. This freshman, fewer than 48 hours into his collegiate career, was disrupting an offense that scored more touchdowns than all but four teams nationwide the previous season.

A few days later, Applewhite thought he drew up the perfect play. The plan was to get a running back in space and force someone out of position to contain him.

“The problem was that he was being covered by a 285-pound freaking nose guard, and he was being covered really well,” Applewhite says. “He was on his hip like a linebacker.”

In 2016, Oliver helped Houston conquer Oklahoma and Louisville. Four of his five sacks on the year came in those two games.

While many staffs would be concerned with the possibility of a sophomore slump, Oliver provided no reason to worry. Instead of running against fellow linemen in practice, Oliver pushed to run against linebackers and tight ends.

“There’s nothing mellow about Ed,” Applewhite says. “There is no off switch, and I love it. I love his energy and love the way he practices. Our guys see that one of the most nationally recognized players in the country is going hard every day. He goes really, really hard.”

During last season, the coaches toyed with using Oliver at running back in goal-line situations. The play was 22 Crunch, a simple handoff to the right side of the line so Oliver could carry the ball in his dominant hand.

Unclear why the staff had limited him to only the right side, Oliver convinced Applewhite he was up for it. The next play, he barreled into the end zone at full speed, running behind his older brother. Although it is unknown whether Oliver will be used at running back in 2017, the head coach has not ruled it out.

“I believe you can use him very much like the Texans used J.J. Watt,” Marcus says of Ed. “I think we could do similar things.”

        

IF HE WERE allowed to leave in a matter of months, Oliver would be one of the most coveted defensive players in the draft. He has all the qualities to be the No. 1 overall pick.

His body and mind are ready for the NFL, even if the NFL isn’t ready for him. As it stands now, Oliver owns a squat of nearly 650 pounds. If he had to run a 40-yard-dash, he believes he could come close to running it in 4.6 seconds at 290 pounds.

The notion that he would ever sit out his junior season has not crossed his mind. The entire business of the sport, in some ways, still feels so far away. It’s easy to lose sight of the fact that he’s still in the infancy of his sophomore season.

Perhaps business will enter his mindset if the dominance continues, and it almost certainly will. “Then maybe you start thinking about insurance and protecting yourself,” he says. “But I haven’t proven anything.”

Although some could view the next couple years as a burden—an obstacle standing in the way of a long, lucrative professional career—Oliver views it differently. He has almost two more full seasons, at least, to make believers of the football world. To convince it that he is the best player on earth. To prove to himself, his biggest and most vocal critic, what he is capable of.

“I’m still not doing enough,” he says. “I have to go harder. It will never be enough.”

He has at least a few more months to play alongside his brother, the reason he’s here to begin with. In the spring, the two matched up against one another for the first time in their football lives. Marcus says the moment felt larger. Ed says his brother was just another player in those few moments, although his tone and voice say otherwise.

Their roles have reversed over the years. Ed is now the teacher rather than the student, showing Marcus how to handle bull rushes, counters and speed the likes he may never see again. Marcus is thankful for all of it—even the most miserable, taxing practice reps.

“I know I’m his brother, but I speak to him as a football player,” Marcus says. “He’s unbelievable. … I want him to do everything.”

While he waits to take his next football step, Oliver will play for Houston. Not just the program, but a city that will be recovering long after he finally departs for the NFL.

During those days away from Houston before the season, as the city was overcome with water, the few hours on the practice field in Austin were the moments Oliver felt like himself. 

The field has always been a place of comfort for Oliver. It was a way of staying in motion and out of trouble as a boy. Now, it is his release. It’s a place where names, faces and even his own blood blend together; perhaps the only place Oliver is truly himself.

And for a few hours each Saturday over the next two falls, the city of Houston can find its own release, if only for a short while. It can lose itself in its team and a player who stands proudly for his hometown. He won’t be hard to find.

   

Adam Kramer covers college football for Bleacher Report. Follow him on Twitter: @KegsnEggs.

Read more College Football news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2733839-ed-oliver-is-the-best-player-in-cfb-and-hes-not-the-only-one-who-thinks-so

Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins

Dellin Betances Shocked by Joe Girardi Replacing Him vs. Rays on Wednesday

A day later, New York Yankees reliever Dellin Betances remains miffed manager Joe Girardi removed him from Wednesday’s 3-2 win over the Tampa Bay Rays after pitching two-thirds of an inning.

I was shocked. I was surprised,” Betances said Thursday, per the Associated Press (via ESPN.com). “I think a lot of people were surprised. … I just felt like I didn’t really put myself in harms way. A lot of times I do, but right there I just gave up one hit to [Evan] Longoria. That’s all I really did.”

With the Yankees holding a 3-1 lead, Betances got Lucas Duda to fly out to center field before allowing a single to Longoria. He then struck out Logan Morrison before Girardi replaced him with Aroldis Chapman.

The 29-year-old has struggled somewhat in 2017. His FIP has climbed over a full run, from 1.78 in 2016 to 3.06, according to Baseball Reference. His 6.67 walks are also second-highest among qualified relievers, per FanGraphs.

Girardi may have been considering three rough outings from Betances earlier in the month as well when he decided to bring on Chapman in the eighth against Tampa Bay.

The right-hander allowed one earned run in his one inning of service in New York’s 7-4 win over the Baltimore Orioles on Sept. 4. The next day, Betances blew a save as he surrendered a walk-off two-run homer to Manny Machado. In his subsequent appearance, Betances gave up two inconsequential runs as New York coasted to a 16-7 win over the Texas Rangers on Sept. 10.

Girardi’s move Wednesday nearly backfired. Chapman walked Steven Souza Jr. and allowed an RBI single to Adeiny Hechavarria before striking out Wilson Ramos to end the inning.

Chapman walked Curt Casali before getting three straight strikeouts to end the game and register the save.

Read more MLB news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2733321-dellin-betances-shocked-by-joe-girardi-replacing-him-vs-rays-on-wednesday

Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas

Eli Manning Responds to Ben McAdoo Criticizing His Play vs. Lions in Week 2

New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning brushed aside criticism directed toward him by head coach Ben McAdoo following Monday night’s 24-10 defeat to the Detroit Lions.

Hey, you lose games, you only score 10 points you deserve some criticism,” Manning said Tuesday, per the New York Post‘s Paul Schwartz. “Coach McAdoo knows I can handle it. You got to be able to handle the fire on game day and afterward. That’s part of the deal.”

Down 17-7, the Giants had a 4th-and-goal at the Lions’ 2-yard line in the third quarter. New York received a delay-of-game penalty after Manning and center Weston Richburg were unable to get the snap off before the play clock expired. As a result, the Giants opted for a field goal instead of attempting to score a touchdown.

After the game, McAdoo singled the sequence out, saying “the quarterback and the center need to be on the same page there.” The comments begin at the two-minute mark in the video below:

It would appear the delay of game won’t become a larger issue inside the Giants locker room, which is a good thing since the team’s 0-2 start already has the media buzzing.

According to OddsShark, 83 teams have lost their first two games to open a season. Of that group, only nine have reached the postseason. The Giants achieved the feat in 2007 en route to winning Super Bowl XLII, but history generally isn’t on New York’s side as the team looks to turn things around in 2017.

Read more NFL news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2734107-eli-manning-responds-to-ben-mcadoo-criticizing-his-play-vs-lions-in-week-2

Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson

GSP Meets His Childhood Bully on the Street, Turns His Life Around

Georges St-Pierre wasn’t always the great warrior he is today.

In fact, the warrior spirit that pushed him to become the greatest welterweight of all time, and to soon return for a middleweight title fight against Michael Bisping at UFC 217, was developed out of a childhood on the wrong end of bullying.

St-Pierre has long spoken about his tough childhood, where his time as a small, timid lad in Quebec led to him catching more than his share of beatings in the schoolyard.

Today, though, St-Pierre is a global star, an icon in his native Canada and an inspiration to many for his gentlemanly manner and respect for martial arts tradition in the chaos of life in MMA. Part of that manner is the ability to forgive and forget.

St-Pierre recently told Hot 97 that he ran into one of his childhood nemeses on the street, a man who routinely wailed on him back in the day. Their fortunes, it appeared, had gone in drastically different directions since then, though, as the man was begging passers-by for money.

“I don’t know if he was homeless, but he was asking for money,” St-Pierre said. “When he saw me, he recognized me.”

Apparently forgetting their past, or in straits dire enough to ignore it and shoot his shot, the man asked St-Pierre for help. St-Pierre replied: “Man, what are you doing here? You’re a tall guy, you’re good looking. What the hell?”

He handed the man some money and continued his admonishment.

“I gave him a few dollars and I [told] him: ‘Get out of here…you should be ashamed, you should be embarrassed of what you’re doing, man. A lot of guys would kill to be like you. You know you’re full of potential. You’re good looking, healthy, tall and strong. Go do something with your life,” St-Pierre recalled.

After going on his way, St-Pierre was told by his family that there was recently a visitor to his childhood home, still occupied by his parents: Mr. Bully. And Mr. Bully was something of a different man than the one St-Pierre had met on the street.

“He went to my house where my parents live. He knocked on the door, and he said: ‘Can I talk to Georges?’”

St-Pierre’s father informed him that his son had moved out, and the bully continued.

“He goes, ‘well I met him a few months ago, and [he] said something to me to shake me up and I just want to say that he changed my life. Now I have a job and I’m doing well, and I want to say thank you. When you see him, tell him I said thank you.’”

Pretty typical of the nice guy act St-Pierre has become known for in his MMA career, but good to know it extends beyond the realm of martial arts and fight promotion and into his off days walking the streets. 

UFC 217 goes down November 4 at Madison Square Garden.

Check out the full interview below:

 

Follow me on Twitter @matthewjryder!

Read more MMA news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2733166-gsp-meets-his-childhood-bully-on-the-street-turns-his-life-around

Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing